February 3, 2021 – NATIONAL THE DAY THE MUSIC DIED DAY – NATIONAL CARROT CAKE DAY – NATIONAL GIRLS AND WOMEN IN SPORTS DAY – NATIONAL WOMEN PHYSICIANS DAY – NATIONAL MISSING PERSONS DAY – National Day Calendar

NATIONAL THE DAY THE MUSIC DIED DAY

The Day the Music Died Day on February 3rd remembers the unfortunate and untimely death of singers 22-year-old Buddy Holly, 17-year-old Richie Valens, and 28-year-old J. P. Richardson, aka: “The Big Bopper.”  These three artists died in an airplane accident on February 3, 1959, near Clear Lake, Iowa. Their pilot, Roger Peterson, also perished in the crash.

The Day the Music Died was dubbed so by Don McLean’s song  “American Pie”

Buddy Holly’s band was on tour and had played at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake.  They were headed to their next destination in Moorhead, Minnesota.  For this leg of their journey, they decided to take a charter plane rather than go with their tour bus. Richardson “The Big Bopper”,  had swapped places with Waylon Jennings, taking the latter’s place on the plane and Tommy Allsup had lost his place to Ritchie Valens in a coin toss.

Not long after takeoff, they were no longer able to be reached by radio, and they did not reach their destination. The aircraft was reported missing. The next day, the wreckage was found less than 6 miles northwest of the airport in a cornfield.  Poor weather conditions and pilot error were determined, during the investigation, to have been the cause of the pilot losing control of the plane.

Pilgrimage & Tribute

The tragic event echoed through history for over 50 years. Visitors still make the pilgrimage each year to Clear Lake, Iowa, the resort town about 110 miles north of Des Moines, as this was the point of their last concert before the fatal accident.

“The day the music died” is a line in the 1972 Don McLean hit “American Pie.” McLean’s song, which he wrote in the late 1960s and released in 1971, was in part inspired by the tragic event which took the lives of three great musicians and their pilot.

“American Pie” lyrics by Don McLean

“But February made me shiver,
With every paper I’d deliver,
Bad news on the doorstep
I couldn’t take one more step. 
I can’t remember if I cried
When I read about his widowed bride
But something touched me deep inside,
The day the music died.”

HOW TO OBSERVE #TheDayTheMusicDied

Listen to some of the music by Richie Valens, Buddy Holly, or The Big Bopper.

Use #TheDayTheMusicDied to post on social media.

NATIONAL THE DAY THE MUSIC DIED DAY HISTORY

The observance commemorates the fateful day in 1959 when four young lives were cut short. When Don McLean’s “American Pie” hit the airwaves in 1972, the world came to know the day as “the day the music died’ from the line in the lyrics. Another line in the song reflected on the music of Buddy Holly & The Crickets. In their song “That’ll be the Day” the chorus goes like this:

“Well, that’ll be the day, when you say goodbye
Yes, that’ll be the day, when you make me cry
You say you’re gonna leave, you know it’s a lie
‘Cause that’ll be the day when I die

In McLean’s “American Pie” his similar line appears in the chorus as well:

“Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
And them good ole boys were drinking whiskey and rye
Singin’ this’ll be the day that I die
This’ll be the day that I die

NATIONAL CARROT CAKE DAY

National Carrot Cake Day on February 3rd, celebrates one of America’s favorite flavors of cake. In the carrot cake, we get to eat our cake and veggies, too!

Carrot cake closely resembles a quick bread from its preparation to its final consistency. Quick breads mix the wet and dry ingredients separately before combining, and the final product is coarser than a traditional cake. Creamy frosting separates the layers and often complements the spice of the cake. Cinnamon and nutmeg go well with the natural sweetness of carrots. Many bakers add nuts or raisins to their recipes as well. 

The carrot’s natural sweetness may have been selected as a substitute in the Middle Ages when sugar was hard to find or expensive. Carrot cake most likely developed from a carrot pudding which could be savory or sweet.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalCarrotCakeDay

Bake a carrot cake to celebrate. Include friends and family by inviting them to join you. Serve a hot beverage or two. If you need a recipe, we found several worth trying. While you’re enjoying the cake, look ahead to other celebrations on the calendar.

Listen to the National Daily podcast and flip a coin to see who will serve up the next delicious baked good so you can #CelebrateEveryDay with us. Don’t forget, use #NationalCarrotCakeDay to share on social media, too!

National Day Calendar staff wonder if we dangle a carrot, would the creator of this day step forward?

NATIONAL GIRLS & WOMEN IN SPORTS DAY

Around the country, National Girls and Women in Sports Day is recognized by schools, organizations, and teams during the first week of February.

Athletics play an important role in girls’ lives. Besides helping to establish a routine for a healthy, active lifestyle, sports build confidence, leadership skills, and the ability to work with a team.

But there is so much more to participating in sports. Women who participated in sports in school are more likely to graduate from college. According to an EY study, women increase their odds of landing leadership positions when they have a background in athletics.

Girls develop lifelong valuable relationships during their sports careers, too. It’s not just serious business.

It also doesn’t matter the sport. Whether girls choose to be a part of the volleyball team or prefer to aim for par or better in golf, the health, leadership, and academic benefits develop with each one.

HOW TO OBSERVE #GirlsAndWomenInSportsDay

Support girls and women athletics in your area. Get involved. For more information on how visit Women Sports Foundation. Share how sports influenced your life. Use #GirlsAndWomenInSportsDay to share on social media.

NATIONAL GIRLS AND WOMEN IN SPORTS DAY HISTORY

On February 4, 1987, President Ronald Reagan declared the first National Women in Sports Day in recognition of the history of women’s athletics. It also recognized the progress made by the Title IX amendment passed in 1972.NATIONAL WOMEN PHYSICIANS DAY – February 3

NATIONAL WOMEN PHYSICIANS DAY

On February 3rd, honor the path that female doctors have paved since 1849 as we recognize National Women Physicians Day.

This day marks the birthday of Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States in 1849. Dr. Blackwell initiated the movement that helped women gain entry and equality in the field of medicine.

If society will not admit of a woman’s free development, then society must be remodeled. ~ Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell

The day celebrates the courage of Elizabeth Blackwell and the accomplishments of female physicians everywhere. At the same time, the day strives to bring improvements to the workplace for the growing number of women physicians entering the field of medicine.

While the number of women doctors gradually increased in the last two decades, 2016 statistics show 35% of physicians are women. A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine last year revealed that women doctors earn on average 8% less than their male counterparts. That discrepancy, along with nearly a third of women physicians reporting sexual harassment in the workplace and a large majority experiencing gender bias. Clearly, there is still work to be done.

National Women Physicians Day recognizes the strides made by generations of women doctors. The observance also recognizes that we must strike a balance that allows women to succeed professionally while supporting a family. Join National Women Physicians Day in celebrating these accomplishments and supporting women physicians as colleagues, friends, family, and doctors.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalWomenPhysiciansDay

On February 3rd we are asking not only the medical community, but also our larger community of patients, families, and the public to celebrate National Women Physicians Day in hospitals and clinics, medical schools, and on social media. We are in an exciting time for medicine. We are connecting virtually and creating a collective voice that can be used to create positive changes for physicians and patients alike. Use  #IAMBLACKWELL, #WomensDocsInspire and #NWPD to share on social media. 

NATIONAL WOMEN PHYSICIANS DAY HISTORY

In an effort to raise awareness of the importance of a physician-led healthcare team and female physicians’ roles in medicine, Physician Moms Group and Medelita founded February 3rd as National Women Physicians Day. Physician Moms Group successfully celebrated the first National Women Physicians Day on February 3, 2016. 

The Registrar at National Day Calendar® declared the observance in 2017.

About Physician Moms Group

Physician Moms Group (PMG) was founded in November 2014 by Dr. Hala Sabry to bring together women physicians, who are also parents, to collaborate and support each other while sharing their medical expertise in an open forum. The PMG’s mission is to provide resources, a platform to network, and an opportunity to share information with like-minded individuals. The PMG network includes over 65,000 women physicians of all specialties across the globe. For more information, visit www.mypmg.org and follow them on Twitter @PhysicianMomsGp.

NATIONAL MISSING PERSONS DAY

On February 3rd, National Missing Persons Day focuses the attention of the country long enough to recognize a missing person.

It might be surprising to learn that every day in the United States, approximately 2,300 people are reported missing. However, anyone making the report, waiting at home for their loved one or actively looking for them, those numbers no longer surprise.

When such a large part of our lives goes missing it leaves a profound void. It’s not a fillable space. Those who have experienced it, those who report 2,300 missing people per day, know.

Everyone has a friend, mother, sibling, child, neighbor or coworker they see every day. No one expects to have them mysteriously and with no explanation to disappear from their lives. It’s a challenging thought. One so difficult to contemplate, it makes it hard to attract the attention of those unfamiliar with the missing person to become involved.

It won’t happen to me.

We often think it won’t happen to us. When a person goes missing, it can be an adult as often as it is a child. Women disappear more than men and seniors are at risk, too. Health risks, natural disasters, unplanned circumstances, and of course, those who are taken against their will fall into the list of statistics. They can all apply to us.

According to the 2016 National Crime Information Center’s stastics, there were 88,040 active missing person records.

The families of those who go missing, need the support of neighbors and friends. They need our support to continue the search, to keep getting the word out. At the same time, make a plan for your own family. Make it a priority to take the simple steps to be educated and aware.

Fortunately, in today’s digital world it’s easier than ever. National Missing Persons Day encourages you to be alert, share their names, their pictures and bring them home to their families.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalMissingPersonsDay

For every missing person, support their families by being alert, sharing their information, their pictures and bring them home. Visit these websites for more ways to help, find resources and tools in your area.

NATIONAL MISSING PERSONS DAY HISTORY

Jo Ann Lowitzer founded National Missing Persons Day to provide increased awareness of the needs of the missing. Her daughter, Alexandria, went missing in 2010. Continued alertness and awareness improve the chances of returning loved ones to their families.